Industry workshop: Applying smoothed particle hydrodynamics
30 Oct 2016
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We're bringing together companies and industry representatives that are interested in finding out more about how they can apply the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) technique within their R&D

 

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When: Weds 30 November 2016, 09:30 - 17:30

Where: Hartree Centre, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Cheshire

Price: Free

Timetable: Download timetable (PDF - 165kB - link opens in a new window)

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Do you have R&D problems that traditional CFD or solid mechanics can’t solve?

Do you want to take advantage of the latest techniques which could provide valuable insight that you can use to improve products and services?

This event aims to bring together companies and industry representatives that are interested in finding out more about how they can apply the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) technique within their R&D and connect them with leading, UK-based SPH experts from the Hartree Centre and other academic institutions.

With origins in astrophysics, where this technique was developed to calculate large gas cloud and galaxy formations, and with over 30 years grounding in worldwide research, SPH has already made an impact in the computer games and animation industries – remember the scene where Gollum sinks in to the lava in the final Lord of the Rings film?

At this one day workshop we will introduce you to the power and potential of SPH in the automotive, aerospace, naval and engineering sectors. Industry representatives will be given an opportunity to describe and explore current challenges to academic researchers, who will then be empowered to describe their own industry-relevant work and suggest potential solutions to the problems presented.

How does SPH work?

Instead of using a mesh as the basis of its calculations, SPH uses a set of points. As it does not involve the time-consuming process of creating a mesh, this means it can fit well with industrial processes that involve rapid prototyping or as a starting point for more time-consuming mesh based calculations.

What are the advantages?

It lends itself well to massively parallel high performance computing (such as GPUs and the Intel Xeon Phi) as well as traditional MPI based solutions. It also has the unique advantage of providing insight where a free surface exists in a CFD simulation or where challenges involve large deformation, like you would get in a sloshing fuel tank or high speed impact of a solid into a surface.

For more information or any questions you may have, please contact Luke Mason.  

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